The Hay Man Cometh

And he kindly said what an excellent stand of hay, you should get about a hundred bales off that.  Then  he mowed it down to the dirt and roared off down the road!

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Well, said Daisy. Quite the conversationalist isn’t he?

He will be back on Wednesday to see how it is drying and then I will rake it and he might bale on Thursday evening. Lets hope the weather does not throw any curved balls again. John is deeply envious of the hay man’s mower, it compresses the hay or something and sets it back on the ground in rows already.  Very posh.

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Yesterday I made peach ice cream, peach chutney and started another jar of peach brandy. And still there are peaches on the tree. 

Here is my fresh Peach Chutney recipe. Using produce from the gardens. We ate this last night with chicken. 

Sweat 1 tablespoon garlic, 2 finely chopped shallot, and 1 jalapeno. Add 1 1/2 pounds of chopped peaches and a tablespoon of chopped rosemary. Then 1/3 cup of sugar.  Cook for about 3 minutes then deglaze with 1/3 cup of brandy, 2/3 cup of apple cider vinegar and a dash of balsamic.  Cook until peaches are soft – about 20 minutes.  Store in fridge. 

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Good morning. Today I will be pickling beetroot and making one small batch of zuchinni relish. I am the only one who likes it so I will not be making too much. 

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I hope you all have a lovely day. I will. 

your friend, celi.

46 thoughts

  1. Peach chutney sounds delish – pure summer. Ran a quick search on the zuchinni relish but didn’t come up with anything, may we have that recipe too please? Hope the hay works out with less stress this time 🙂 Laura

  2. The hay man probably has a haybine. They are wonderful. You make less trips around the field so less soil compaction and the hay should dry faster. The rain must have missed you last night we had a storm roll through around 11:30pm. There were still puddles in the street this morning. Really rain on freshly cut hay is not as bad as rain on dried hay. I am envious of your garden. Mine is puttering along slowly, I think it gets too much shade. My poor pumpkin plant is looking sad so next year I will remember the Diatomaceous Earth tip. My mom battled squash bugs every year especially after the canning company started growing pumpkins near us. Soon as they would spray the fields, mom’s squashes and cukes would be infested. We gave up trying to grow pumpkins

    • We had the thunder and lightening and then the wind but only the lightest of sprinkles blowing past. You must have collected all the rain which I am grateful for. If you can keep doing that for the next four days it would be grand!! And that reminds me, I watered everything yesterday so i had better go and sprinkle the DE about again. I am not sure if we will get any pickles, I go to those plants too late, but the zuchinni are springing forth!! wonderful.. c

  3. The pasture shot is a completely different perspective than you’ve ever shown us, correct? Unless I missed it. Seeing that treehouse in the background just makes me want to climb it. What a great treehouse. You ought to take us into and upon it, if it’s safe, of course.

    Enjoy your day in the kitchen. It’s a lovely one here in southeastern Minnesota. Cool breeze. Sun shining. Just lovely.

    • I have probably avoided that POV for the last seven months due to the plethora of builders trucks and trailers that have littered that side of the house. I will climb the treehouse for you though, maybe today.. it is a lovely view from up there! c

  4. What an efficient man! and how wonderful that he can look at your field and estimate how many bales you’ll get! You’ve got to admire few words, action and experience in a man – a man with a useful piece of farm equipment that is!!!
    Christine

    • Yes and lets hope he knows what he is talking about. I would LOVE a hundred bales. Though I have also ordered another hundred from my usual supplier. in fact i must begin to get his eggs over to him. c

  5. good luck with your hay. i hope the rain holds off. you must be relieved to be getting it done. i love a good chutney! i wish my zucchini would produce. i am still only getting male blossoms. i can’t figure out why?

  6. Those are mighty nice looking windrows, C! Hopefully the hay man was mighty nice looking too! 🙂 I hardly got past the words “peach ice cream” though! Peaches are my most favorite fruit in all the world and when made into ice cream….OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOH! Can I have your recipe??

  7. Lovely hay, Viv will pray rain stays away. We had one of those bright noisy windy storms a couple of nights ago. I watered during it, as there was only the occasional drip of water from the sky.
    We too had cold chicken and chutney tonight. Jock refused the peach chutney from 2002, so there was all the more for me. He had last year’s marrow and apple chutney.

    A lot of the arriere cuisine (back kitchen) stuff went the 7km to the new house today, and Jock adapted the shelving units to bridge the sink in the garage, and to accommodate the shapes of the pipes. Our new fridge, dishwasher and induction hob are installed and ready to go. We went up to the village to pay Alain from the ironmongery and thank him for his beautiful work. They gave us a set of beautiful saucepans (including a steamer) as a “discount”. It really is looking empty here now, but the moving men will be dismantling wardrobes and packing all the fragile stuff and making the final move on 5th August.

    Have a lovely day, love ViV x

    • The fifth is coming right on down the pike!, as the old codger says. I am so glad that finally you are on the second half of the moving. At the beginning the whole thing looks so daunting! Is this the first place you and jock have moved into without him doing major renovations? c

  8. Oh I do hope you had a lovely day.And I just put my ice cream maker thingy in the freezer and it’s peach season here too…so thanks for reminding me what flavour of ice cream I want to make tomorrow!

  9. The farm looks beautiful in the summer. How lovely to have such an abundance of peaches. Your peach chutney sounds very good. That’s a lot of cooking your doing but how special to be doing it all with your own home-grown goodies xx

  10. I can imagine how relieved you must be to know you have another hundred bales or so of hay towards the winter season in addition to what has already been put under cover with such difficulty. Am writing out your peach chutney recipe for when our fruit arrives: sounds like ‘good stuff’ to give to neighbours as a Yule present too 🙂 ! Those zucchini look a treat!!!!! And, yes, am looking forwards to the other recipe also: yours are such sensible ones!

  11. Oh, I have been waiting impatiently for Ontario peaches to the grocery store, everything seems to be late this year. I have never had squash bugs in cukes, so I decided to avoid zucchini and other squash this year and just grow cucumbers mine are about an inch long so should be ready soon.

  12. Love the yellow zucchini. Nigella has a yellow soup recipe using them. The hay looks very neatly dealt with; hope the weather cooperates this time.

  13. Hi Celi, I never thought of that, that each farm doesn’t own their own equipment for all of the chores, but it totally makes sense — I learn something from you each time I read your blog.
    Lucky you to have such a quantity of peaches, I adore peach chutney. We’ve been having a bit of a cold front so it’s lovely and comfortable, some would even say it’s a bit chilly.

    • it is in the 60’s here this morning.. very cool.. a good day to pick peaches! We do have a hay baler but it is broken but you are right it is easier and cheaper to employ someone with all the latest equipment to bale the hay. And faster! c

  14. Your peach chutney looks delicious! I’m off to get more peaches this afternoon to make more frozen peach pops…but ice cream may not be far behind. Been out of town and am catching up. Glad to see your hay looking so fine and that they hay man “cameth”.

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