Udder Watch.

We go  through this every year don’t we! Waiting for the babies.

So we are watching Poppy – no change. Lady Aster – filling up nicely. Alex- filling up too soon and Aunty Del – no change yet.

Yesterday was wonderful – many of you rose to the invitation to share your work-spaces. For me though yesterday got a bit busy so I am going to go through and look at all your spaces today.  Thank you so much for joining in.  I have a few in my email inbox too and will share these with you all tomorrow.

udder

And my photos from yesterday are rubbish too. Except for these interesting ones. Well, this is interesting to me as I am still flummoxed by  this girl having such a developed (though small) udder with two months to go.  Aunty Del has just over two months to go and no udder to speak of at all. So this is a conundrum for me. (Hard to get decent shots for you).

heifer udder

She is such a fast mover this wee heifer that it is hard to get a decent shot at all.  But she is still being friendly and frequently slowly approaches  and just bumps my hand or arm with her nose.  Then moves off again. She has a very direct gaze.

So we will see – but the good news is that Lady Astor is proceeding at a comfortable pace and her udder is filling up  nicely. Let me count the days until  she is due.  EIGHTEEN!  That is coming up fast. So – if all goes well we might have a new calf in eighteen days (or sooner – or later). I need to get the milking apparatus set up.  Sadly this will all happen after Inaki leaves. However our new guest worker, Connor,  comes in a week so he will be here to share in the excitement.  He is from New York.

Today Inaki and I will turn the electric fence back on Across the Way and let the two small heifers  (Naomi and Difficult) out onto the grass.  Then we are going to work on stringing a new low line around one of the fields, over there, for the pigs (Manu and Molly and Tahiti).  That will be interesting because none of my pigs has ever been introduced to an electric fence so I need to get the height just right so when they get the first shock they jump back and not forward through the fence. As you know animals only ever get shocked a few times – after that they just do not go near the wire at all.  There will be a long training period before they are let out and left unattended.

And the weather forecast says clear and sunny with not too much wind. That would be marvellous! I have lots of seeds ready to go into the garden too.

I hope you have a lovely day – at break time I am coming to visit all your work spaces! Thank you. See you soon.

Love celi

 

22 thoughts

  1. I love Baby watch on the farmy 🙂 it certainly brightens up my winter. I dare say each Mama will produce her offspring in her own good time, no matter what we desire. Hope all the home births are going to be easy on you. I wish I wasn’t such a duffus with technology I could have sent you a picture. I definitely need a 4yr old in my house. Laura

  2. I love your photos of the maternity ward – udderly fantastic! Sorry, sorry, couldn’t resist. Miss Alex is such a pretty girl, I’m glad she’s a little less stand-offish now. Still that lovely surfer-chick hair, thick and sun-bleached.

  3. This year I don’t have any bred does (by choice, but still a bit sad) so I am vicariously enjoying other folks’ waiting and watching. I don’t how how Spring will seem like Spring here without new kids leaping about the place. Hasn’t been a problem yet, though, since the weather is still so cold it is clearly Not Spring!

  4. I loved looking at all the fab work spaces yesterday and more to come tomorrow! I remember when you did something similar with people’s daily view, that was good too. Looking forward to all the new babies ☺️

  5. Your photos look pretty good to me. 🙂 Baby watch can be a nail biter. Hoping for the best on all fronts. I always worry about the electric fences but they are less obtrusive than a real physical fence. Hope today is lovely and kind to you.

  6. The pictures of Alex are lovely; perhaps she’ll have that calf much earlier than expected. To hear she is approaching you with the appearance of a little affection makes me feel all warm and fuzzy inside. Sounds like an exciting time on the farmy, with babies popping all over. Will Naomi and Difficult be mature enough this summer to mate (is that the proper term, ‘mate’?)?
    Hope your piggies aren’t too disturbed by the electric fence and it keeps control of them.
    I’ve loved looking at all the photos of everyone’s work spaces. ~ Mame 🙂

  7. Alex still has time to go. I raise Dexters and they, like most cows are easy to tell when they are truly getting close. As a first calf heifer she’ll bag up and possibly go back down a little before she gets really serious about baby. I find with mine that the better indicator is their backend. When she really blossoms out, I mean jiggly like jello, and her backend is so engorged it looks uncomfortable, then she’ll be a week to a few days out. The udders of dairy cattle versus the udders of Dexters is almost like comparing apples to oranges. Keep an eye on her lady bits and if she’ll let you, try to wiggle her tail head. If it doesn’t move much, she’s no where close. Is she bred to another dun or a black bull. My herd is entirely black with dun in their lineage. First heifer of the season was a dun this year! Good luck.

  8. Pingback: Otherwhere: Good Stuff | Charlotte Rains Dixon

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